Call for Applications – Civil Liberties

Update: Deadline to apply extended to January 15, 2018! 

The Centre for Communication Governance at the National Law University Delhi (CCG) invites applications for research positions in its Civil Liberties team on a full time basis.

About the Centre

The Centre for Communication Governance is the only academic research centre dedicated to working on the information law and policy in India and in a short span of four years has become a leading centre on information policy in Asia. It seeks to embed human rights and good governance within communication policy and protect digital rights in India through rigorous academic research and capacity building.

The Centre routinely works with a range of international academic institutions and policy organizations. These include the Berkman Klein Center at Harvard University, the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford, the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, Hans Bredow Institute at the University of Hamburg and the Global Network of Interdisciplinary Internet & Society Research Centers. We engage regularly with government institutions and ministries such as the Law Commission of India, Ministry of Electronics & IT, Ministry of External Affairs, the Ministry of Law & Justice and the International Telecommunications Union. We work actively to provide the executive and judiciary with useful research in the course of their decision making on issues relating to civil liberties and technology.

CCG has also constituted two advisory boards, a faculty board within the University and one consisting of academic members of our international networks. These boards will oversee the functioning of the Centre and provide high level inputs on the work undertaken by CCG from time to time.

About Our Work

The work at CCG is designed to build competence and raise the quality of discourse in research and policy around issues concerning civil liberties and the Internet, cybersecurity and global Internet governance. The research and policy output is intended to catalyze effective, research-led policy making and informed public debate around issues in technology and Internet governance.

The work of our civil liberties team covers the following broad areas:

  1. Freedom of Speech & Expression: Research in this area focuses on human rights and civil liberties in the context of the Internet and emerging communication technology in India. Research on this track squarely addresses the research gaps around the architecture of the Internet and its impact on free expression.
  2. Access, Markets and Public Interest: The research under this area will consider questions of access, including how the human right to free speech could help to guarantee access to the Internet. It would identify areas where competition law would need to intervene to ensure free, fair and human rights-compatible access to the Internet, and opportunities to communicate using online services. Work in this area will consider how existing competition and consumer protection law could be applied to ensure that freedom of expression in new media, and particularly the internet, is protected given market realities on the supply side. We will under this track put out material regarding the net neutrality concerns that are closely associated to the competition, innovation, media diversity and protection of human rights especially rights to free expression and the right to receive information and particularly to substantive equality across media. It will also engage with existing theories of media pluralism in this context.
  3. Privacy, Surveillance & Big Data: Research in this area focuses on surveillance as well as data protection practices, laws and policies. The work may be directed either at the normative questions that arise in the context of surveillance or data protection, or at empirical work, including data gathering and analysis, with a view to enabling policy and law makers to better understand the pragmatic concerns in developing realistic and effective privacy frameworks. This work area extends to the right to be forgotten and data localization.

Role

CCG is a young and continuously evolving organization and the members of the centre are expected to be active participants in building a collaborative, merit led institution and a lasting community of highly motivated young researchers.

Selected applicants will ordinarily be expected to design and produce units of publishable research with Director(s)/ senior staff members. They will also be recommending and assisting with designing and executing policy positions and external actions on a broad range of information policy issues.

Equally, they will also be expected to participate in other work, including writing opinion pieces, blog posts, press releases, memoranda, and help with outreach. The selected applicants will also represent CCG in the media and at other events, roundtables, and conferences and before relevant governmental, and other bodies. In addition, they will have organizational responsibilities such as providing inputs for grant applications, networking and designing and executing Centre events.

Qualifications

The Centre welcomes applications from candidates with advanced degrees in law, public policy and international relations.

  • All candidates must preferably be able to provide evidence of an interest in human rights / technology law and / or policy / Internet governance/ national security law as well. In addition, they must have a demonstrable capacity for high-quality, independent work.
  • In addition to written work, a project/ programme manager within CCG will be expected to play a significant leadership role. This ranges from proactive agenda-setting to administrative and team-building responsibilities.
  • Successful candidates for the project / programme manager position should show great initiative in managing both their own and their team’s workloads. They will also be expected to lead and motivate their team through high stress periods and in responding to pressing policy questions.

However, the length of your resume is less important than the other qualities we are looking for. As a young, rapidly-expanding organization, CCG anticipates that all members of the Centre will have to manage large burdens of substantive as well as administrative work in addition to research. We are looking for highly motivated candidates with a deep commitment to building information policy that supports and enables human rights and democracy.

At CCG, we aim very high and we demand a lot of each other in the workplace. We take great pride in high-quality outputs and value individuality and perfectionism. We like to maintain the highest ethical standards in our work and workplace, and love people who manage all of this while being as kind and generous as possible to colleagues, collaborators and everyone else within our networks. A sense of humour will be most welcome. Even if you do not necessarily fit requirements mentioned in the two bulleted points but bring to us the other qualities we look for, we will love to hear from you.

[The Centre reserves the right to not fill the position(s) if it does not find suitable candidates among the applicants.]

Positions

Based on experience and qualifications, successful applicants will be placed in the following positions. Please note that our interview panel has the discretion to determine which profile would be most suitable for each applicant.

  • Programme Officer (2-4 years’ work experience)
  • Project Manager (4-6 years’ work experience)
  • Programme Manager (6-8 years’ work experience)

A Master’s degree from a highly regarded programme might count towards work experience.

CCG staff work at the Centre’s offices at National Law University Delhi’s campus. The positions on offer are for duration of one year and we expect a commitment for two years.

Remuneration

The salaries will be competitive, and will usually range from ₹50,000 to ₹1,20,000 per month, depending on multiple factors including relevant experience, the position and the larger research project under which the candidate can be accommodated.

Where candidates demonstrate exceptional competence in the opinion of the interview panel, there is a possibility for greater remuneration.

Procedure for Application

Interested applicants are required to send the following information and materials by December 30, 2017 to ccgcareers@nludelhi.ac.in.

  1. Curriculum Vitae (maximum 2 double spaced pages)
  2. Expression of Interest in joining CCG (maximum 500 words).
  3. Contact details for two referees (at least one academic). Referees must be informed that they might be contacted for an oral reference or a brief written reference.
  4. One academic writing sample of between 1000 and 1200 words (essay or extract, published or unpublished).

Shortlisted applicants may be called for an interview.

 

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Supreme Court considers installation of CCTV units in courts – but will it regulate what happens next?

Earlier this month, the Supreme Court heard a petition seeking directions to ensure audio-visual recording of the proceedings in trial courts. The reasoning behind the request was that recording proceedings would enhance the fairness of trials. The Supreme Court decided to limit the question to whether CCTV (video only) cameras may be installed at various locations in the courts, in order to better serve security and administrative needs.

This is not the first time the Supreme Court has discussed the use of CCTV cameras for security and other purposes. However, there is also no comprehensive law that deals with the use of CCTV cameras and related security and privacy issues.

In the present case, the Court initially noted that multiple courts, including the courts in Gurgaon have undertaken such efforts in the past. The Court then requested the additional solicitor general and a senior advocate present in the court as amicus to visit the courts in Gurgaon, and report on the matter within four weeks. It stated that once the report is received, it will consider directing installation of CCTV (video only) cameras at district courts in various states. It has also indicated that any recordings made by these CCTV cameras will not be available to the public, and will be retained for specified periods of time only.

The Court has considered the use of CCTV cameras in public places in previous cases. In Deputy Inspector General of Police and Anr. v. S. Samuthiram, a case regarding eve-teasing / sexual harassment, the Court took cognizance of such cases and the need for prevention mechanisms. Amongst other things, it directed all states and union territories to install CCTV cameras in public places. The CCTV cameras were to be positioned such that they act as a deterrent to potential offenders, and if an offence was committed, the offenders would be caught / identified.

In Dilip K. Basu v. State of West Bengal and Ors, the Court considered the request of the amicus, and directed state governments to: (a) take steps to install CCTV cameras in all the prisons in their respective states, within a period of one year from the date of the order (but not later than two years), and (b) consider installation of CCTV cameras in police stations in a phased manner depending upon the incidents of human rights violation reported in such stations.

State governments have also, in various instances, directed the installation of CCTV cameras in public places. In Tamil Nadu, the state government has directed that CCTV cameras must be installed in every public building. The cameras must be installed in accordance with the recommendations of the local police officers. Such recommendations may be made for purposes such as ensuring public order or controlling crimes and the reasons for the recommendation must be recorded in writing.

In Chandigarh, the local government released a set of draft rules meant to regulate mobile app-based transport aggregators (such as Uber and Ola). Among other things, these draft rules require that every taxi must install a CCTV unit to monitor activities inside the taxi in real time. The rules suggest that the video feed from the CCTV cameras should be linked to a control room established by the aggregator.

The above are some examples of courts and government bodies providing for installation and use of CCTV cameras and video recordings. There is a common trend among them – the orders and rules only deal with when and where the units are to be installed, and used. They do not, however, provide a procedural / regulatory mechanism to ensure proper, lawful use of such cameras and associated video recordings.

Maintenance of law and order, security, deterrence of criminal activity, and identification of offenders, are all important issues, and appropriate means should be adopted to provide for the same. At the same time, there needs to be a balance between such means, and individual rights, such as the right to privacy. These laws and orders largely deal with installation and use of CCTV cameras in public places, where some may argue that an individual does not have a reasonable expectation of privacy. However, reports suggest there is misuse of CCTV cameras, especially where installed in customer heavy locations such as retail outlets.

Such misuse could be dealt with under some existing provisions of laws such as the Information Technology Act, 2000 – for example under the provision which criminalizes capturing of images or videos of an individual’s private parts, or the data protection rules. However, these laws are of limited applicability, and deal mostly with sensitive personal information, and images or videos of a private / sexual nature. We do not currently have a comprehensive law that deals with  surveillance equipment and its use in public spaces. Although some states such as Tamil Nadu provide that CCTV cameras must be installed based on police recommendations, there is no general prohibition or restriction on their installation and use. Further, there are no specific restrictions on the collection, use, retention, or transfer of any video recordings, or information that is derived from such recordings. There is no mechanism put in place to deal with a situation where an individual’s data is shared without authorization.

Certain authorities within the country appear to have recognized this gap, and taken some steps towards addressing these issues. In Maharashtra, the local municipal corporation in Navi Mumbai has implemented a CCTV surveillance system to help the local police maintain law and order. The corporation has issued a ‘voluntary code of conduct’ in relation to all surveillance camera systems in public and private places. This document attempts to “provide a framework to all the stakeholders so that there is proportionality and transparency in their use of surveillance”. Among other things, it provides that (i) the use of a surveillance system must always be for a legitimate and specified purpose; (ii) establishments must be transparent about the use of CCTV cameras on their premises; and (iii) access to the video feed will be limited and subject to clearly defined rules on persons who can gain access and purposes for which access may be gained.

Even a limited framework such as this, goes a long way towards ensuring transparency and protection of individual rights and freedoms. Perhaps the Supreme Court will provide more nuanced directions, not only on the installation of CCTV cameras, but also on the use of associated video recordings when the matter is next brought up.